Transcribed Essays

How does the transcription process work? Transcription team member Justin Clement gives a Prezi demonstration of how a digitized page gets turned into a transcription.

  • Dr Angel Luke O’Donnell, Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London Jump to Essay Transcription & Images The ‘America is Lost!’ piece was a short essay written by George III reviewing the causes and effects of the American Revolution. It potentially provides a fascinating insight into the thoughts of King George about the […]

  • Professor Arthur Burns, Vice Dean for Education, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Professor of Modern British History, King’s College London There are few more dramatic incidents in the recent history of the British monarchy than the abdication of Edward VIII on 11 December 1936, not least because the act was captured in such a vivid […]

  • By Tom Murray, King’s Undergraduate Research Fellow, King’s College London I was introduced to transcription as part of the Georgian Papers Programme (GPP), and as such my transcribing experience is decidedly Georgian. Having transcribed a number of documents for the GPP, however, the value of transcription for historians has become manifest. Admittedly, there remains nothing […]

  • Nathaniel F. Holly, Ph.D. Candidate in History, William & Mary   Jump to Transcription & Images In what is surely one of the best examples of early modern clickbait, King George III laments the loss of Britain’s American possessions with what was must have been a tortured scream of anguish: “America is lost!” But what […]

  • Justin B. Clement, Ph.D. Candidate in United States History, University of California, Davis Jump to Transcription & Images The 1783 Peace of Paris brought a grueling eight-year war to an end, but its generosity shocked many Britons to the core.  By offering lenient terms in the treaty negotiations, Prime Minister William Petty, Lord Shelburne, hoped […]

  • Remarks on the Preface to the Account of the Musical Performance in Commemoration of Handel’ George III

    Professor Matthew Head, Department of Music, Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, King’s College London This brusque memo in the hand of George III is a smoking gun. It is addressed to one Josiah Bates, a naval administrator, antiquarian musician and Handel-enthusiast who directed the epochal performances of Handel’s music that took place in Westminster Abbey and […]