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Transcribed Essays

“Long a Dispute Amongst Antiquarians”: How a King’s Understanding of History Changes our Understanding of a King (and History)

Posted on: January 20th, 2017 by Debbie Cornell No Comments

Nathaniel F. Holly, Ph.D. Candidate in History, William & Mary   Jump to Transcription & Images In what is surely one of the best examples of early modern clickbait, King George III laments the loss of Britain’s American possessions with what was must have been a tortured scream of anguish: “America is lost!” But what… Read More »

America Lost? The Birth of Britain’s Capitalist Empire

Posted on: January 20th, 2017 by Debbie Cornell No Comments

Justin B. Clement, Ph.D. Candidate in United States History, University of California, Davis Jump to Transcription & Images The 1783 Peace of Paris brought a grueling eight-year war to an end, but its generosity shocked many Britons to the core.  By offering lenient terms in the treaty negotiations, Prime Minister William Petty, Lord Shelburne, hoped… Read More »

‘Remarks on the Preface to the Account of the Musical Performance in Commemoration of Handel’, George III

Posted on: January 19th, 2017 by geoIII No Comments

Professor Matthew Head, Department of Music, Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, King’s College London This brusque memo in the hand of George III is a smoking gun. It is addressed to one Josiah Bates, a naval administrator, antiquarian musician and Handel-enthusiast who directed the epochal performances of Handel’s music that took place in Westminster Abbey and… Read More »