Archive

Research

The Admiral and the Aide-de-Camp

Posted on: May 3rd, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

The Revolutionary War Correspondence of Sir Samuel Hood and Jacob de Budé by Jim Ambuske, Ph.D. The portrait of one of the most important British naval officers to serve during the American War for Independence hangs in the Manchester Art Gallery in Manchester, England. The 1783 painting by famed artist Sir Joshua Reynolds depicts Rear… Read More »

The Georgian Papers Programme: Slave Trade, Slavery and Abolition in the Royal Archives, c. 1785–1810

Posted on: January 23rd, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

The Georgian Papers Programme: Slave Trade, Slavery and Abolition in the Royal Archives, c. 1785–1810[1] by Suzanne Schwarz (University of Worcester) Georgian Papers Programme Fellow, 2016 The award of a Georgian Papers Programme Fellowship, funded by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture in Williamsburg, Virginia, provided an invaluable opportunity to trace how… Read More »

“Long a Dispute Amongst Antiquarians”: How a King’s Understanding of History Changes our Understanding of a King (and History)

Posted on: January 20th, 2017 by Debbie Cornell No Comments

Nathaniel F. Holly, Ph.D. Candidate in History, William & Mary   Jump to Transcription & Images In what is surely one of the best examples of early modern clickbait, King George III laments the loss of Britain’s American possessions with what was must have been a tortured scream of anguish: “America is lost!” But what… Read More »

America Lost? The Birth of Britain’s Capitalist Empire

Posted on: January 20th, 2017 by Debbie Cornell No Comments

Justin B. Clement, Ph.D. Candidate in United States History, University of California, Davis Jump to Transcription & Images The 1783 Peace of Paris brought a grueling eight-year war to an end, but its generosity shocked many Britons to the core.  By offering lenient terms in the treaty negotiations, Prime Minister William Petty, Lord Shelburne, hoped… Read More »

‘Remarks on the Preface to the Account of the Musical Performance in Commemoration of Handel’, George III

Posted on: January 19th, 2017 by geoIII No Comments

Professor Matthew Head, Department of Music, Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, King’s College London This brusque memo in the hand of George III is a smoking gun. It is addressed to one Josiah Bates, a naval administrator, antiquarian musician and Handel-enthusiast who directed the epochal performances of Handel’s music that took place in Westminster Abbey and… Read More »

Further thoughts on ‘America is Lost!’

Posted on: January 19th, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

Dr. Angel Luke O’Donnell, Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London The ‘America is Lost!’ piece was a short essay written by George III reviewing the causes and effects of the American Revolution. It potentially provides a fascinating insight into the thoughts of King George about the future of the British Empire after… Read More »

Reflections on ‘Essay on Public Opinion’

Posted on: January 16th, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

Dr. Emrys Jones, Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture, King’s College London It may be stating the obvious to point out that what was understood as constituting ‘public opinion’ in the eighteenth century bears little resemblance to the culture of opinion polls and click rates that often accompanies the term in today’s usage. It rarely… Read More »

“Awesome, Wow”: King George III in the American Popular Imagination

Posted on: October 5th, 2016 by Karin Wulf No Comments

by Karin Wulf As we consider the range and depth of materials emerging from the Georgian Papers Programme it’s clear that any number of historical subjects will be newly framed or newly illuminated. And it’s likely that a more subtle perspective on King George III will be among the project’s outcomes. Historians have interpreted eighteenth-century… Read More »

Research in the Round Tower: Report from Rick Atkinson

Posted on: August 30th, 2016 by Martha Howard 1 Comment

by Rick Atkinson I’ve worked in some exotic locations—Mogadishu, Mali, Baghdad, Kazakhstan, Riyadh—but none more evocative than the top of the Round Tower in Windsor Castle, where I spent the month of April 2016, as a Georgian Papers fellow. The researcher’s path to this archive is steep: through the Henry VIII Gate and the Norman… Read More »

Report from Jim Ambuske

Posted on: June 17th, 2016 by Martha Howard No Comments

by James Ambuske, University of Virginia In 1768, the Philadelphia physician Benjamin Rush toured the House of Lords during a visit to London. He persuaded his guide to allow him to sit upon George III’s throne, an experience that deeply moved him. I lay no claim to Rush’s brilliance, but I did share in his… Read More »