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“Awesome, Wow”: King George III in the American Popular Imagination

Posted on: October 5th, 2016 by Karin Wulf No Comments

by Karin Wulf As we consider the range and depth of materials emerging from the Georgian Papers Programme it’s clear that any number of historical subjects will be newly framed or newly illuminated. And it’s likely that a more subtle perspective on King George III will be among the project’s outcomes. Historians have interpreted eighteenth-century… Read More »

Meeting the “humane and gracious sovereign”

Posted on: February 15th, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

by Cynthia Kierner, Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme Fellow and Professor of History at George Mason University Looking through thousands of Hanoverian manuscripts in the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle was an amazing experience that gave me a deeper understanding of the Georgian era. The letters exchanged between George III and Lord North, for instance,… Read More »

The Georgian Papers Programme: Slave Trade, Slavery and Abolition in the Royal Archives, c. 1785–1810

Posted on: January 23rd, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

The Georgian Papers Programme: Slave Trade, Slavery and Abolition in the Royal Archives, c. 1785–1810[1] by Suzanne Schwarz (University of Worcester) Georgian Papers Programme Fellow, 2016 The award of a Georgian Papers Programme Fellowship, funded by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture in Williamsburg, Virginia, provided an invaluable opportunity to trace how… Read More »

What Digital Does: Queen Charlotte Online

Posted on: January 21st, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

by Karin Wulf See also An Analog King in a Digital Age Scholars of women, gender, family, domesticity, fashion, food, and so much more will have plenty of fodder in the Georgian Papers Programme.  Queen Charlotte was invested in literature and learning, for herself and her children.  She and the women around her generated important materials… Read More »

Analog King in a Digital Age

Posted on: January 21st, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

by Karin Wulf See also: What Digital Does: Queen Charlotte Online King George III’s prodigious intellectual curiosity is reflected in his stunning collections of clocks and scientific instruments, his library, and his writing. When we convert this very analog King to digital form, what do we gain? In one of the most poignant examples of… Read More »

“Long a Dispute Amongst Antiquarians”: How a King’s Understanding of History Changes our Understanding of a King (and History)

Posted on: January 20th, 2017 by Debbie Cornell No Comments

Nathaniel F. Holly, Ph.D. Candidate in History, William & Mary   Jump to Transcription & Images In what is surely one of the best examples of early modern clickbait, King George III laments the loss of Britain’s American possessions with what was must have been a tortured scream of anguish: “America is lost!” But what… Read More »

America Lost? The Birth of Britain’s Capitalist Empire

Posted on: January 20th, 2017 by Debbie Cornell No Comments

Justin B. Clement, Ph.D. Candidate in United States History, University of California, Davis Jump to Transcription & Images The 1783 Peace of Paris brought a grueling eight-year war to an end, but its generosity shocked many Britons to the core.  By offering lenient terms in the treaty negotiations, Prime Minister William Petty, Lord Shelburne, hoped… Read More »

A Project of Imperative Importance

Posted on: January 20th, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

by Barbara B. Oberg The Georgian Papers Programme at Windsor Castle is an ambitious, collaborative enterprise to digitize and disseminate in searchable form an extraordinarily large and rich collection of letters, state papers, and household ledgers from the Archives of George III. The archives contain internationally significant material for a tumultuous period of military conflict… Read More »

‘Remarks on the Preface to the Account of the Musical Performance in Commemoration of Handel’, George III

Posted on: January 19th, 2017 by geoIII No Comments

Professor Matthew Head, Department of Music, Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, King’s College London This brusque memo in the hand of George III is a smoking gun. It is addressed to one Josiah Bates, a naval administrator, antiquarian musician and Handel-enthusiast who directed the epochal performances of Handel’s music that took place in Westminster Abbey and… Read More »

Further thoughts on ‘America is Lost!’

Posted on: January 19th, 2017 by Martha Howard No Comments

Dr. Angel Luke O’Donnell, Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London The ‘America is Lost!’ piece was a short essay written by George III reviewing the causes and effects of the American Revolution. It potentially provides a fascinating insight into the thoughts of King George about the future of the British Empire after… Read More »